For those of you who aren’t familiar, here’s a nice little primer on the 15-minute adventuring day. It all boils down to the idea that, as soon the party expends a few resources (spells per day, hit points, etc.) they’ll call a halt, find the nearest broom cupboard to hole up in, and camp for the night. Eight hours later they rise refreshed, ready to take on the world (read: another measly encounter) with all their renewed powers. Needless to say, this is less than heroic behavior.

For all of its shortcomings, 4th Edition D&D did a great job combating this problem, introducing the concept of the short rest. This 5-minute breather allowed players to regain “encounter powers” and spend “healing surges” to replenish their hp. 5th Edition continued the trend, allowing for players to spend hit dice to recover hit points on a short rest. Sadly, as much as I love me some Pathfinder, the solution there appears to be “buy a wand of cure light wounds.”

If you look for articles and troll the forums, you’ll see a lot of the same advice about “harass the lazy jerks with wandering monsters” and “put in some kind of time limit.” Maybe I’m blessed with good players, but my current group tends to make it a point of honor to make progress before nap time.

As for myself, I’ve learned to accept the 15-minute adventuring day as the cost of doing business. This probably has something to do with my experience in Oblivion. I couldn’t understand why the game was so hard! I’d spend hours running into dungeons, hacking away at zombies, and then running outside again. I can’t tell you how many sandwiches I made for myself waiting for that stupid health bar to replenish. Thank Gygax my buddy came over, mocked me mercilessly, and told me about the sleeping mechanic.

“You mean I can just hit two buttons, pass out, and regain my HP?”

“Dude…yeah.”

After that I started referring to my hapless bard as Snorlax.

How about you kids? Do you find the 15-minute adventuring day to be a problem at your tables? How do you combat it?