In an ideal world, everyone in your party is a loot communist. The caster gets the scrolls, the warrior gets the beat stick, and the skill monkey gets the trombone of invisibility (or whatever random absurdity the skill monkey wants to claim this week). In other words, the right loot goes to the right person, never mind the value.  You’re a team after all, and those sweet, sweet magic items are there to help you all succeed, whether or not one of you happens to have 10% more wealth-by-level. Besides, you can always make up the difference in raw currency. That’s what gold is for; it evens out the disparity if one of you happens to stumble over a belt of significantly better statsBesides again, you’ve got a GM at the head of the table who will (in that aforementioned ideal world) provide magic items tailored for the rest of the party. My theory goes that, if you’re patient, everything will even out in the end.

The alternative is to be “perfectly fair” by selling off everything and dividing up the profits. Sounds great on paper, but it’s super inefficient in practice. In D&D 3.X you only get half value for your loot, meaning you get more bang for your buck by sticking with whatever happens to fall in your path.

Then of course there’s players like Fighter. They’re the reason that you’ve got to invent a party charter and give out shares like you’re the goddamn Pirates of the Caribbean. And I don’t think I have to tell you why that’s a pain in the ass.